Monday, 17 January 2011



I caught up with Flik Hall last week to ask her a few quick questions about what inspires her and how she goes about designing pieces for her collections. She's a very talented young designer and, being home-grown talent, I couldn't pass up the chance to pick her brains on where those ingenious patterns and textures combos came from! Check out her story below...
You use an awesome mix of fabrics in your work - I love the combination of hessian
with leather! How do you find which materials work best with each other and what are
you planning on experimenting with for your next collection?


The materials that I use each season depend very much on what has inspired my work and
the effect I want to provoke. I find it interesting to work with material that are unorthodox
or foreign, those with a purpose perhaps more commonly associated with something other
than clothing; or materials that we don’t get to see used very often - used in an unexpected
way. It’s more exciting because it’s about discovery and the unfamiliar. I’m currently more
inclined to choose fabrics that oppose each other in their qualities and characteristics. I love
to choose fabrics that look would be perceived as awkward together when in conception,
but combined in a configured way really work for each other. I love leather at the moment
because I’m finding it so versatile and dynamic and amenable to the ideas that I have. For my
next collection I am continuing to work with leather but with new twists!

What has been the highlight of your fashion career so far and what are you looking
forward to?


I would definitely have to say the shoot for my first collection ‘Scope of Time’. Although
I have been much more excited by more recent things, for me when you actually see your
clothes work as a piece of art for the first time....apart from in your imagination that has to be
the strongest memory.

I love the dolls arms on your SS11 collection! Where do you get your ideas for the
prints you use?


I took imagery from looking into the lives of Mexican families and the composition of
alters that they display in their homes. The alters would appear chaotic but seemed very
beautiful to me at the same time. Many of the alters are juxtapositions of items such as family
memorabilia, a white horse, dolls, cords, religious paintings and even sweet corn. I became
particularly interested by alters that were present in the home in memory of children that had
died. They would be filled with dolls of all description in various outfits, some bigger and
smaller than others. I was fascinated by the interesting spaces shaped in-between the dolls
which was what led me to experiment with porcelain dolls arms for my print. Much of the
colour palette was inspired by the state the walls had been left in the home during various
hurricanes. The hessian I used in the collection is a fabric that plays a great part in their lives
used as table clothes, clothing and even as bags for collecting sweet corn.

Do you dress in your own designs? If not, what sort of style do you adopt?

IRIS APFEL

Yes, I do wear my own designs, all of the items I design I resonate with. Sometimes part
of my inspiration is thinking about what’s not out there; or what is, but improved upon or
expanded upon (subjectively). I think that although it is important to know your market,
having enthusiasm for a garment you would love to wear yourself brings about a much
stronger piece.

I think that style is a continuous evolution so if I was to attempt to categorize my style
it would be an inaccurate description very soon. For the moment I would say I am quite
unbounded and flamboyant, how I dress communicates who I am from day to day.

Whose style do you admire?

I love Iris Apfel, her style; attitude and vision are so unique; she is one of a kind and totally
exotic! I also really admire Francoise Hardy’s effortless elegance.

Flik Hall moved to London following her school years and moved into Hackney soon after. She enrolled at Central St Martin’s college where she pursued her options, and quickly developed her curiosity in fashion design. Flik Hall discovered and developed a love for print design in particular. She then left college to take placements with various designers such as House of Holland and Giles Deacon, where she engaged in all areas of the design studio. During her time there, she began setting up her own label. She launched her first season SS10 “Scope of Time” soon afterwards.
Flik Hall’s work is brightly hued where the garments movement and print takes centre stage. Employing a wide range of prints nothing is quite what it seems in Flik's work where contrast is key. Flik’s SS11 collection, “Mannequin Parade”, is a showcase of Flik’s signature aesthetic of bold silhouettes and captivating prints.

Flik Hall's work is available to buy on Not Just A Label.com

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